Merger with Microdrones Brings More R&D Possibilities for Schübeler

When seeking to develop and enhance new and innovative technology or adding features to legacy products, being bogged down by the minutia of running a small business can take the focus off a company’s real objective: product design and creation. Administrative duties, organizational concerns and sales in an international market often take precedence over research and development.

Such was the case for Daniel Schübeler , CEO and Founder of Schübeler Technologies GmbH, a premier manufacturer of advanced fan propulsion jets, fan drive nozzles, and lightweight composite materials fabrication. However, late last year, the company merged with Microdrones, the pioneering provider of fully integrated systems for surveying, mapping, LiDAR and inspection applications used in the construction, mining, energy, agriculture and infrastructure industries.

With a fused interest in technological advancement and a motivation to propel UAV’s to new heights, these two companies have united, combining knowledge and expertise that bring benefits to both companies. While the merger expands Microdrones’ UAV technology capabilities, Schübeler now has the freedom to focus on research and development, creating cutting-edge innovations that will shape the future of UAVs, electric jets and more.

Watch this video to see why Schübeler stakeholders feel the merger with Microdrones has brought the company more space, more tools and more possibilities.

 

Second only to the Eiffel Tower in Paris, the Space Needle, built for the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair, is one of the most easily-identified skyline features in the world. Epitomizing the leading-edge modernization and technology that the city is known for, the Space Needle serves as a symbol to propel Seattle’s future innovation. Known as the Century Project, the multi-year renovation of the 57-year old structure began in 2017.

Among other reconstruction, included in the $100 million Space Needle renovation is a glass-floor observation deck that rotates, providing magnificent panoramas that encompass Mount Rainier and Elliott Bay. An architectural marvel, these renovations necessitated more than 176 tons of 10 different varieties of glass to be added to the Observation Deck and restaurant level. Featuring panels measuring 11 feet high by 7 feet wide, weighing roughly 2,300 pounds each, maneuvering these glass panes to the tophouse presented a plethora of challenges, requiring creativity and innovation to ensure flawless and secure placement.

 

Enter Schübeler Technologies’ fan propulsion systems! Since its founding in 1997, Schübeler has built a global business by providing a full product lineup of advanced robust ducted fans, compressors, pumps, electric motors, carbon fiber and aluminum composites designed to withstand extreme conditions in demanding field use. These components provide thrust, high power and lightweight durability to high tech applications. Watch this video to see how Schübeler’s flying ingenuity helped to expand this iconic structure’s famous views by 25%.

 

 

"Flying Glass" from Chad Copeland on Vimeo.

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